Greetings from Maryland

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Greetings from Maryland

Post by Navy General Board » Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:07 am

Hello Everyone,

I have long held an interest in steam power plants. I also write for a few naval history websites.

I recently have been researching information for a piece on triple expansion engines and turbines. Eventually, I would like to construct models of each to collect data.

I decided to join this forum to learn from those with experience. Unfortunately, I cannot contribute much knowledge, but I hope everyone here would be kind enough to share what they know.
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by TahoeSteam » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:58 pm

Welcome to the forum. There are decades (if not centuries) of collective hands-on experience here and many whom are willing to help. What are the aims of your writings?
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Kelly Anderson » Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:48 pm

Navy General Board wrote:I recently have been researching information for a piece on triple expansion engines and turbines.
What piece are you after?
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Navy General Board » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:14 pm

Kelly Anderson wrote:
Navy General Board wrote:I recently have been researching information for a piece on triple expansion engines and turbines.
What piece are you after?
Right now I am collecting data.

I am searching for more first hand experience. Find use who have utilized such engines and get their first hand accounts on the operation of those engines. Any quirks, issues with maintenance, etc.

Once a few other projects are out of the way and time willing, maybe build a test mule to collect additional data
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by cyberbadger » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:33 pm

Navy General Board wrote:
Kelly Anderson wrote:
Navy General Board wrote:Find use who have utilized such engines and get their first hand accounts on the operation of those engines. Any quirks, issues with maintenance, etc.
There is a general recognized concept that somewhere say around 2000 Horsepower steam turbines start to make more sense then reciprocating steam engines.

If you look at the Steam Boating Association of Great Britian (SBA), which has the largest membership of steamboaters world wide, they have a boat Register with an advanced search capability.

If you search by engine type - I can't even find an example of steam turbine powered steamboat.

Small turbines are loud, hard to come by, inefficient(at this scale), and not terribly powerful(at this scale).

Almost any turbine that would be appropriate would just do very poorly compared to pretty much any reciprocating steam engine. A 1-10 horsepower reciprocating steam engine is the norm for a steamboat up to 40ft in length.

Poke around the SBA's register and take a look at the Advanced Search...

http://www.steamboatassociation.co.uk/page-1117882

Hey - but if want to make a small turbine steamer go for it! I'm sure it can be done, just not common for several very good reasons.

Welcome to the forum.

-CB
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Mike Cole » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:57 pm

Hi
www.ss-shieldhall.co.uk

Shieldhall must be the largest steamer on our books at 268 feet long and build quite late 1955 and even she has Up and Downers rather than turbines

Mike
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by DetroiTug » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:54 pm

Here is a small steam turbine with 4" diameter rotor assembly (it has three rotors) my buddy is working on and I've been working with him on it. Sorry about the video quality (cell phone).

This is on 80 psi air and there will be another reduction shaft for final drive. This is very easy to build with a lathe and drill press. No fancy 4D machining involved. Uses 3/8" timing belts and pulleys.

The sound speaks for itself :)

-Ron

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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Navy General Board » Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:25 am

cyberbadger wrote: There is a general recognized concept that somewhere say around 2000 Horsepower steam turbines start to make more sense then reciprocating steam engines.

If you look at the Steam Boating Association of Great Britian (SBA), which has the largest membership of steamboaters world wide, they have a boat Register with an advanced search capability.

If you search by engine type - I can't even find an example of steam turbine powered steamboat.

Small turbines are loud, hard to come by, inefficient(at this scale), and not terribly powerful(at this scale).

Almost any turbine that would be appropriate would just do very poorly compared to pretty much any reciprocating steam engine. A 1-10 horsepower reciprocating steam engine is the norm for a steamboat up to 40ft in length.

Poke around the SBA's register and take a look at the Advanced Search...

http://www.steamboatassociation.co.uk/page-1117882

Hey - but if want to make a small turbine steamer go for it! I'm sure it can be done, just not common for several very good reasons.

Welcome to the forum.

-CB
Much appreciated for the info. I will certainly go there to gather info.

By built comparison engines, I mean build a boiler and the powerplants. I'd like to be able to swap one engine out for the other on the same boiler. I am really after the figures on horse power, fuel consumption, and the like.
Haven't really thought of building a model to test on the water, but that might be something for a little further down the road.
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Navy General Board » Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:26 am

Mike Cole wrote:Hi
http://www.ss-shieldhall.co.uk

Shieldhall must be the largest steamer on our books at 268 feet long and build quite late 1955 and even she has Up and Downers rather than turbines

Mike
Thank you for the tip. I just reached out to them.
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Re: Greetings from Maryland

Post by Navy General Board » Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:28 am

[quote="DetroiTug"]Here is a small steam turbine with 4" diameter rotor assembly (it has three rotors) my buddy is working on and I've been working with him on it. Sorry about the video quality (cell phone).

This is on 80 psi air and there will be another reduction shaft for final drive. This is very easy to build with a lathe and drill press. No fancy 4D machining involved. Uses 3/8" timing belts and pulleys.

The sound speaks for itself :)

-Ron

Good stuff. That is about the size of the model I would need. Just large enough to be able to connect my instruments to. The simplicity really appeals to me.
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