Another story question

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fredrosse
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Re: Another story question

Post by fredrosse » Tue May 29, 2018 4:07 pm

The African Queen (Movie Fame) was single-handed, at 30 feet length. Not too much of a stretch to run a similar boat that is a few feet longer. I agree that a bigger boat takes usually more hands, but with typical launch layout, the engine, steering, and boiler firedoor can all be within easy reach of one person.

Tending a steam locomotive with maybe several hundred horsepower is indeed a full time job, but a lazy steamboat, typically less than 1-1/2 horsepower per ton, results in a steam plant that needs attention far less often. A 35 ft steam launch, 10 tons displacement, with 10 nominal horsepower, would go just under 6 knots, burning around 60 pounds per hour of coal, just about a full 5 gallon bucket of coal per hour.
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DetroiTug
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Re: Another story question

Post by DetroiTug » Tue May 29, 2018 4:12 pm

Quote: "a liquid burner would be much easier to control"

That is true and that is how we fire our steam cars which are essentially single-handed. However, even as small as they are, I can attest that tending the water and fire while driving plus looking back occasionally to make sure there is no smoke and the burner is behaving is a considerable distraction. Of course we are cruising at about four times the speed of a steamboat, it's happened on more than one occasion when looking back up from the sight glass has resulted in the need for quick braking. The car is really quiet and people will step right out in front of it.

-Ron
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swedtug
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Re: Another story question

Post by swedtug » Tue May 29, 2018 9:43 pm

I have mine 30 foot 10 tons kg tug set up to be singeld handeld, i often run it my self, in tight quarters or in narrow Canals i start my waste oil burner. works fine.
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Lopez Mike
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Re: Another story question

Post by Lopez Mike » Wed May 30, 2018 5:25 am

A little off of the subject but . . .

I found an old work log of my father's from the late 1930's when he was working as the fireman on a steam locomotive. The locomotive and crew were on what was called 'pusher' duty when they waited in a side track at the bottom of a long hill, entered the main line behind the train and hooked up without the train stopping. Then, at the top of the hill they disconnected and waited for a chance to go back down the hill and wait for the next train that needed the extra push.

The helper locomotive wasn't the latest design a the time. It had no superheater and was hand fired. The log shows one extreme event where he moved 12 tons of coal into the boiler in one hour. In my opinion this must be near the limit for human exertion. 24,000 lbs. divided by 60 minutes is 400 lbs. a minute or almost seven pounds a second. Granted there was an automated coal pusher so that he only had to take one step from the pile to the firebox door. But still . . .

He was the junior man on the fireman crew and decided that he would be killed by such efforts and managed to enter a apprenticeship program in the railroad machine shop. He stayed with the trade until 1975.
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Re: Another story question

Post by lostintime » Thu May 31, 2018 3:19 am

Lopez Mike wrote:The log shows one extreme event where he moved 12 tons of coal into the boiler in one hour. .
I feel sorry for the dumb bastard that picks a bar fight with the guy who's pulled that shift for couple years, calluses that can grab a broken beer bottle, and an uppercut that would introduce your chin to your forehead.
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Finley
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Re: Another story question

Post by Finley » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:20 am

I can see that I’d better make it smaller. Still, the Shamrock gives me ideas. Thanks a lot!
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Re: Another story question

Post by Finley » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:28 am

Oh—now I see all the replies. I’m using my phone and missed them. I really appreciate all the input.
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cyberbadger
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Re: Another story question

Post by cyberbadger » Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:24 pm

This is an example of doing a little too much. It was 'ok' in the context and time because there really weren't that many boats out.

Fine for a lazy day, but potentially dangerous during difficult times. - What's your level of acceptable risk? - it varies....

My Nyitra was designed for a crew of 2, and it's 24ft long.

Note the walking across Deck, 1/2 minute on throwing in wood, a few minutes running the injector,don't forget to check the filming drone! - and meanwhile Nyitra has decided on a new course. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWZ4DYoQbUc


This is what is not uncommon on a steamboat that perhaps one person is running in a pinch what really is a 2 man show.

-CB
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Re: Another story question

Post by DetroiTug » Fri Jun 01, 2018 5:55 pm

Quote: "and meanwhile Nyitra has decided on a new course."

The tug is real bad about that. Someone walk from one side to the other, the weight shift changes the heading. It's the result of the very rounded displacement hull. It handles and tracks straight best when there are about eight people aboard, a weight shift of 1/8th of the crew has little effect. Nothing is perfect.

-Ron
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Re: Another story question

Post by PeteThePen1 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:58 pm

Thinking of Shamrock, presumably the one on Windermere, it is worth noting that she does not really fit in with the style of vessel that Finley's story seems to imply to me. If the engine and boiler are in some sort of shack, then the tug style of naval architecture seems to fit better. I have not picked up when this story is set, so I might be way off course. If it is 19th Century, then perhaps the small vessels for colonial use ought to be researched. Of course if I am right about that then the hero must have a hench man/woman who is sweating in the engine room. After all, the skipper will need back up if the boat is attacked.

Shamrock is arranged so that the driver is sitting next to the back of the boiler (side fired locomotive type) with the engine just a fraction behind him. The engine is an HP twin by the way - easy starting. The wheel is side mounted and provided that she always come alongside on the same side as the driver it easy to use the centre mooring rope to secure the vessel for passenger to alight or board. Obviously longer term mooring would use bow and stern lines too. To get a feel for this layout do have a look at the Shamrock Trust website.

Regards

Pete
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