My column-style steamengine

A special section just for steam engines and boilers, as without these you may as well fit a sail.
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dampfspieler
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by dampfspieler » Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:07 am

Hi,

a closer view to the valve nut.

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to be continued
-Dietrich
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by kno3 » Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:38 am

Nice idea removing all that excess metal from the cylinder body. It should work better now that it has less mass to dissipate the heat and more insulation to keep it in.
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Re: My column-style steamengine new Flywheel

Post by dampfspieler » Sun Oct 13, 2019 7:53 am

Hello,

the flywheel was a bit smaller than drawn and i have found it a bit small for a smooth running. What dimensions should have a "good" flywheel?
I have found this ratios for fast running engines:
diameter - ~ 3x boring
depth - ~ 0,75 boring
So i have built a new one and fixed it on the crankshaft.

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to be continued
-Dietrich
Last edited by dampfspieler on Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by dampfspieler » Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:42 pm

Hello,

the D-valve is balanced now. The inside of the valve and the cap are connected to a duct.

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The inner side of steam chest cover.

EinZylBoot_SchieKa091kl.jpeg
EinZylBoot_SchieKa091kl.jpeg (95.8 KiB) Viewed 2536 times

How does it work you can see in this Video
http://youtu.be/8x94ASMtXpk8x94ASMtXpk


to be continued
-Dietrich
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Lopez Mike
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by Lopez Mike » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:56 pm

Did you make that taper lock adaptor for your new flywheel or buy it somewhere?

I would like to convert my flywheel and would rather not build the taper assembly from scratch.

Mike
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by cyberbadger » Sun Oct 20, 2019 5:42 am

dampfspieler wrote:
Sat Oct 19, 2019 7:42 pm
Hello,

the D-valve is balanced now. The inside of the valve and the cap are connected to a duct.
I watched the video. The gentleman in the video has a twin cylinder, like my Toledo - mine is a piston valve. He talks about how this balanced valve lets you run an engine slowly. I don't understand that statement in regards to a twin steam engine. A twin should be able to rotate below 60RPM without trouble - I find that to be a easy thing load or no load with my twin with piston valves. That's 4 strokes/rev that overlap...

To put in the plug to change the operation mode do you have to take off the valve chest bolts?

I wonder if you could do something clever with a neodymium magnet and a steel ball so you could move a magnet over the valve chest and change the operation...

Personally I really admire the robust ruggedness that steam engines offer. Steam engines can last a long time, if my Toledo had an O-ring/cylinder changed every season it would have required 236 O-rings by it's current age. :lol:

I still think your engine is very well thought out and neat engine regardless of that detail.

-CB
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by dampfspieler » Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:24 am

Hello Mike,
... Did you make that taper lock adaptor for your new flywheel or buy it somewhere?
i have bought them Locking Assemblies BAR
They are more easy to mount then taper lock fixtures.

Hello CB,
the operating modus is fix. If i want run the slide valve as a normal there is a bit of work nessesary. The advantage of the balanced valve is the lower force required to move it.


to be continued
-Dietrich
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by Mike Rometer » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:04 am

CB "I watched the video. The gentleman in the video has a twin cylinder, like my Toledo - mine is a piston valve. He talks about how this balanced valve lets you run an engine slowly. I don't understand that statement in regards to a twin steam engine. A twin should be able to rotate below 60RPM without trouble - I find that to be a easy thing load or no load with my twin with piston valves. That's 4 strokes/rev that overlap..."

In the vertical configuration there is no gravity to hold the slide valves to the seat, so running at low pressures becomes more difficult the more the steam pressure drops, as the steam pressure is what holds the valves to the seat. The balanced valve gives back that seat pressure without adding greatly to the pressure supplied by the steam (by reducing the area). Remember though that while slide valves wear in, piston valves wear out.
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by cyberbadger » Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:55 pm

Mike Rometer wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:04 am
In the vertical configuration there is no gravity to hold the slide valves to the seat, so running at low pressures becomes more difficult the more the steam pressure drops, as the steam pressure is what holds the valves to the seat. The balanced valve gives back that seat pressure without adding greatly to the pressure supplied by the steam (by reducing the area). Remember though that while slide valves wear in, piston valves wear out.
I'm still perplexed by bragging about running a steam engine slowly, I own half a dozen engines, mostly single cylinder, mostly d-valves. Running them at slow revs just don't seem like a feature, it's a characteristic the engine should have had anyway, especially for a twin. A basic locomotive has two pistons, if it could not run at slow revs, you wouldn't be able to leave the station. Maybe I've been spoiled by engines I have that come from England, e.g. Stuart Steam Engines.

Certainly true about piston valves. My engine seems to get more blow by above 150psi. but it's welcome to an extent because that blow-by is captured and used by the puffer to further increase the draft fire to really get things going.

-CB
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Re: My column-style steamengine

Post by Mike Rometer » Sun Oct 20, 2019 5:08 pm

With locomotives, mostly, the valve is above the cylinder and benefits from the efforts of Mr Newton. I said mostly, as there are exceptions.
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